Tag Archive | historical fiction

Extract: ‘Katharina Luther: Nun. Rebel. Wife.’, by Anne Boileau

 

To round off my posts as part of the Clink Street Summer Blogival 2017, Allow me to present an extract. Thanks Anne Boileau for the extracts. And also thanks to Rachel Gilbey of Authoright for asking me to take part.

Dr Martin Luther wants marry. He is a priest, so this would be an act of rebellion against the Church, because priests are supposed to be celibate. If he were to propose to Katharina, a former nun, it would mean that both of them would be breaking their vows of chastity. In other words, it would, in the eyes of the church and the wider world, be seen as a union forged in Hell.

Continue reading

Extract: ‘An Almond for a Parrot’

You may remember last month I reviewed An Almond for a Parrot, by Wray Delaney. This month, as part of the blog tour for this novel I would like to present to you and extract of the novel.

 

Almondparrot

Published by: HQ, HarperCollins

Publication date: 27th July 2017

Format: Paperback

I.S.B.N.: 9780008182533

 

Blurb

‘I would like to make myself the heroine of this story – an innocent victim led astray. But alas sir, I would be lying…’
London, 1756: In Newgate prison, Tully Truegood awaits trial. Her fate hanging in the balance, she tells her life-story. It’s a tale that takes her from skivvy in the back streets of London, to conjuror’s assistant, to celebrated courtesan at her stepmother’s Fairy House, the notorious house of ill-repute where decadent excess is a mustTully was once the talk of the town. Now, with the best seats at Newgate already sold in anticipation of her execution, her only chance of survival is to get her story to the one person who can help her avoid the gallows.

She is Tully Truegood.

Orphan, whore, magician’s apprentice.

Murderer?

Continue reading

Review: ‘An Almond for a Parrot’, by Wray Delaney

An Almond for a Parrot Paperback  by

Published by: HQ, HarperCollins

Publication date: 27th July 2017

Format: Paperback

I.S.B.N.: 9780008182533

 

Blurb

‘I would like to make myself the heroine of this story – an innocent victim led astray. But alas sir, I would be lying…’
London, 1756: In Newgate prison, Tully Truegood awaits trial. Her fate hanging in the balance, she tells her life-story. It’s a tale that takes her from skivvy in the back streets of London, to conjuror’s assistant, to celebrated courtesan at her stepmother’s Fairy House, the notorious house of ill-repute where decadent excess is a must

Tully was once the talk of the town. Now, with the best seats at Newgate already sold in anticipation of her execution, her only chance of survival is to get her story to the one person who can help her avoid the gallows.

She is Tully Truegood.

Orphan, whore, magician’s apprentice.

Murderer?

I received this book from the publisher in return for an honest review.

Continue reading

Review: ‘Dunstan’. by Conn Iggulden

Published by: Penguin

Publication Date: 4th May 2017

Format: Hardback

I.S.B.N.:  9780718181444

Price: £18.99

Blurb

The year is 937. England is a nation divided, ruled by minor kings and Viking lords. Each vies for land and power. The Wessex king Æthelstan, grandson of Alfred the Great, readies himself to throw a spear into the north.

As would-be kings line up to claim the throne, one man stands in their way.

Dunstan, a fatherless child raised by monks on the moors of Glastonbury Tor, has learned that real power comes not from God, but from discovering one’s true place on Earth. Fearless in pursuit of his own interests, his ambition will take him from the courts of princes to the fields of battle, from exile to exaltation.

For if you cannot be born a king, or made a king, you can still anoint a king.

Under Dunstan’s hand, England may come together as one country – or fall apart in anarchy . . .

From Conn Iggulden, one of our finest historical writers, Dunstan is an intimate portrait of a priest and murderer, liar and visionary, traitor and kingmaker – the man who changed the fate of England.

Continue reading

Review: ‘The Other Einstein’ by Maria Benedict

Publication date: 18th October 2016

Published by: Sourcebooks Landmarks

BLURB

A vivid and mesmerizing novel about the extraordinary woman who married and worked with one of the greatest scientists in history.

What secrets may have lurked in the shadows of Albert Einstein’s fame? His first wife, Mileva “Mitza” Marić, was more than the devoted mother of their three children—she was also a brilliant physicist in her own right, and her contributions to the special theory of relativity have been hotly debated for more than a century.

In 1896, the extraordinarily gifted Mileva is the only woman studying physics at an elite school in Zürich. There, she falls for charismatic fellow student Albert Einstein, who promises to treat her as an equal in both love and science. But as Albert’s fame grows, so too does Mileva’s worry that her light will be lost in her husband’s shadow forever.

A literary historical in the tradition of The Paris Wife and Mrs. PoeThe Other Einstein reveals a complicated partnership that is as fascinating as it is troubling.


My review

This was a really good novel, told in first person past tense, and narrated by Mileva Maric as she goes from an incredibly intelligent and optimistic student to a tired housewife with two young children and an absent husband. Obviously it is fiction but the book is well researched and delves in to the private lives of the Einsteins. Mileva Maric was an amazingly talented physicist and mathematician who was forced to give up all her work for her marriage and was probably instrumental in the four 1905 papers that made Albert Einstein’s name.

The writing was really fluid and easy to read. The only problem I had was with the occasional information dumps that didn’t quite fit into the plot.

Review: ‘A Front Page Affair’ by Radha Vatsal

cover76241-medium

ISBN: 9781492632665

Published By: Sourcebooks Landmark

Publication date: 1st May 3016

Binding: Paperback

Price: $14.99 (I can’t find a price in £)

Provided to me by Netgalley.com

Blurb

With the Lusitania under water and the United States on the verge of war, Capability “Kitty” Weeks’s dream of becoming a journalist has finally come true—if only she were covering the tragedy instead of writing about society gossip for the Ladies’ Page of the New York Sentinel. But Kitty is closer to the real story than she thought. After a society ne’er-do-well turns up dead at a party on her beat, Kitty stumbles onto schemes that threaten to derail the United States’s attempt to remain neutral. Suddenly, the privileged life Kitty knows, full of easy certainties, is about to change forever.

My Review

I really enjoyed this book. I like historical fiction but often find good historical fiction is hard to come by. This is good historical fiction and utterly refreshing. Set during the early years of the first world war and not a country house drama (for which I am truly grateful), this novel is fast-paced and intriguing. The revelation of the murderer at the end was a surprise and Capability Weeks is a well developed character. Her determination and curiosity keep the reader hooked as they and she learn of each new circumstance. I love her character development from a rather naive young woman to confidence and self-knowledge. I enjoyed the mystery and the changing relationships between the characters as the story develops.

The writing style is very easy to read and flows quickly as the story progresses, the description of life for a well-off woman in the 1910’s in Manhatten is clear, little details like women changing from electric cars – quite, clean and slow – to almost everyone driving internal combustion engines, for example, make it come to life. The author uses the little details to bring the story to life.

5/5 definitely recommended for fans of historical novels and mysteries.