Bonus Review #2: ‘Kitchen Witchcraft: Spells & Charms’, by Rachel Patterson

Kitchen Witchcraft: Spells & CharmsPublished By: Moon Books

Publication Date: 27th July 2018

I.S.B.N.: 978-1-78535-768-8

Format: Paperback

Price: £6.99

Available here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blurb

There are a lot of things in the universe that we don’t understand. When something is meant to happen, it will whether you cast a spell or not. But you can help it on its way by guiding and encouraging it and maybe even tweaking events a little too. A spell can be worked in many ways, from a simple pointing of the finger to a complicated ritual involving lots of herbs and crystals and, of course, any variation in between. What will happen for sure is the boost of confidence and happy buzz you will receive as you cast the spell, as well as the positive vibe you get from putting something into action.
Kitchen Witchcraft: Spells & Charms is a the first in a series of books which delves into the world of the Kitchen Witch. Each book breaks down the whys and wherefores of the subject and includes practical guides and exercises. Other titles include Garden Magic, Altars & Rituals and The Elements.

My Review

This is a good, solid introductory spell book. The first half introduces the author and her ‘philosophy’ of spell working – simple, informal, ethical magic – with the usual lists of correspondences. The second half is a compendium of spells and charms for a variety of situations and need. The author draws of decades of experience as a practising witch and as a High Priestess and teacher to introduce the interested to Kitchen Witchcraft.

It’s easy to read and the instructions are easy to follow, and allow for personal alterations. The book is a handy size and seems robust enough to get covered in all sorts of things. Not sure about the cover image though, seems a bit stereotypical.


Random Rosie Comment

Now, as a scientifically-minded Heathen I’m sceptical of spellwork but even if it just works as a focus for a person’s efforts to improve themselves and a prompt to action, or a placebo, then I don’t have a problem with it. It’s when people get dependant on anything or start to anthropomorphise the universe that I have a problem.

2 thoughts on “Bonus Review #2: ‘Kitchen Witchcraft: Spells & Charms’, by Rachel Patterson

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